Conference

 28-29 May, 2010

 

The Hilton Brighton Metropole Hotel

 (map)

Machiavelli is often called 'the father of modernity' because of his intention to ground politics in an account of human nature free from utopian normativism. This realist design was ill-favoured during religious and idealistic periods of history. Yet recent scholarship identified several thinkers who emulated Machiavelli despite their public denunciation of his politics and morals. The Network's principal objective is to establish whether these thinkers' works and writing strategies constitute a hitherto unidentified, distinct and coherent discourse. If so, then its examination will shed new light on the most fundamental shift in Western politics, from Christian idealism to modern realism, and on the perennial problem of political ethics.

 

 Programme

 

 

28 May, 2010, Day 1

 

         
Session 1 Chairman  

Richard Whatmore

 Comment
         
09:00 - 09:15 Introduction      
09:15 - 10:00 William Connell   The First Anti-Machiavellians: Niccolo's Enemies  Soll
10:00 - 10:45 Ioannis Evrigenis   "Yet were it needlesse to cite Machiavel:" Sir Walter Raleigh's Anti-Machiavellian Machiavellism  Connell
         
10:45 − 11:15 Refreshments      
         
11:15 - 12:00 Harro Höpfl   A Machiavellian Case for True Religion and Virtue  Rahe
12:00 - 12:45 Hans Blom   Predestination and Reason of State: Origins of Dutch Republicanism  Stapelbroek
         
12:45 - 14:30 Lunch      
         
Session 2 Chairman   Béla Kapossy  
         
14:30 - 15:15 Jan Waszink   Tacitism: the Dynamics of Political Scepticism in Seventeenth-century Northern Europe  Höpfl
15:15 - 16:00 Noah Dauber   Religion and the Idea of the State in Hermann Conring's Edition of and Commentary on Machiavelli's Prince  Waszink
16:00 - 16:45 Lea Boralevi   James Harrington's Machiavellian Anti-Machiavellism  Sullivan
         
16:45 - 17:15 Tea      
         

 

29 May, 2010, Day 2

 

         
Session 3 Chairman   Masataka Yasutake  
         
09:00 −09:15  Introduction                
09:15 − 10:00 Vickie Sullivan   Walter Moyle's Machiavellianism, Declared and Otherwise  Hont
10:00 - 10:45 Paul Rahe   Montesquieu's Anti-Machiavellian Machiavellianism  Yasutake
         
10:45 - 11:15 Refreshments      
         
11:15 - 12:00 Jacob Soll   Frederick II and Voltaire’s Antimachiavel and the Problem of Prudence in an Age of Reason  Nakhimovsky
12:00 - 12:45 Istvan Hont   Hume's Knaves and the Shadow of Machiavellianism  Boralevi
         
12:45 - 14:30 Lunch      
         
Session 4 Chairman   Alessandro Arienzo  
         
14:30 - 15:15 Koen Stapelbroek   The (Anti)-Machiavellian Registers of Eighteenth-century Political Reform in the Dutch Republic through the Pamphlets of Jean Thomas La Fargue  Blom
15:15 - 16:00 Isaac Nakhimovsky   Machiavelli and Fichte’s Theory of the State  Dauber
16:00 - 16:45 Mark Somos   “Hate and Coarse Thinking”: Anti-Machiavellian Machiavellism in H.G. Wells, The New Machiavelli (1910/1911)  Kapossy
         
16:45 - 17:15 Tea      
         
17:15 - 18:00 Conclusions